Tag Archives: Hew McLeod

Controversial professor Gurinder Mann left university under cloud of sexual harassment

Sikh Studies professor left university under cloud of sexual harassment

Among the numerous confidential files released in late February and early March by the University of California to the Associated Press and other news organizations was the 2013 investigation of sexual misconduct allegations against Gurinder Mann, the Kundan Kaur Kapany Professor of Sikh Studies at UC Santa Barbara.

The university concluded that Mann created a hostile educational environment due to verbal and physical harassment of his female student at his home, and that he had behaved sexually inappropriately with many students for many years with some claiming assault.

Department faculty heads had known about these complaints and did nothing, witnesses said. His students said they were expected to be his chelas, or disciples, and Mann their guru. Mann told university investigators that he also had learned at the feet of his gurus and also sat with them on their beds.

Mann cannot be a Sikh because he followed cult leaders known in India as gurus, sants, babas or yogis.

Mann retired in 2015 and began his own Sikh studies program in New York

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W.H. McLeod

mcleod

Will Western Academics “Discover Sikhism” Do Sikhs need to be “Discovered” by the West?

William Hewat “Hew” McLeod (2 August 1932 – 20 July 2009) was a New Zealand controversial scholar who wrote false about Sikh history and culture. He produced many inaccurate and nonfactual books on what he called Sikhs.

 

 

 

 

 

Prespective_on_Sikh_tradition

mcleod

Rebuttal of Doris Jacobsh’s attack on the Sikh Faith (Part I)

Rebuttal of Doris Jacobsh’s attack on the Sikh Faith (Part I)

Response to Doris Jacobsh’s Controversial work ‘Relocating Gender in Sikh History’ by Dr. Baldev Singh PHD who is an academic.  This is just the first chapter of his response.

Chapter 1
University of British Columbia (UBC)
Jakobsh’s work is a typical example of Ph.D. research
produced by a Western university with an “endowed Sikh
Chair.” Her work throws light on the motives behind Sikh
studies programs. To begin with, let us examine some
background information on UBC and her thesis supervisor.
Generally a graduate student investigates the reputation of
7 the university, the department of study and the supervisor
before committing to begin studies. It seems Jakobsh
relinquished this early homework because at the time, UBC
was already knee-deep in a controversy with the Canadian
Sikhs about the objectives of the “endowed Sikh Chair,” as
disclosed in the following advertisement:1
The Department of Asian studies anticipates making a one-year
visiting appointment in Punjabi language and literature and Sikh
Studies for the academic year 1987-1988. We invite your
application or nomination of others who may be qualified to teach
courses in beginning and intermediate Punjabi language and at
least one other field such as Sikh literature, religion or
history. Ph. D. degree required, as well as a very good command
of spoken and written Punjabi.
Candidate should send a complete C. V., samples of research
papers and publications, and the names and addresses of three
referees to Professor Daniel L. Overmyer, Head, Department of
Asian Studies, Asian Centre, 1871 West Mall, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver, B. C., Canada V6T 1W5. Candidates
should request their referees to send confidential letters of
recommendation directly to the same address. The deadline for
completion of applications is May 15, 1987.
The department expects to make a tenure-track appointment to an
endowed position in Punjabi and Sikh studies beginning in July
1988, following the University’s normal procedures. The person
appointed to the one-year visiting position may be a candidate
for the tenure-track appointment the following year.

Sincerely,
Daniel L. Overmyer,
Professor and Head.
However, without regard to the above advertisement, UBC
hired Harjot Oberoi. Amazingly, this fellow had neither
expertise nor fluency in the Punjabi language. He grew up
in Delhi and consequently had very little appreciation of
the Punjabi culture. Moreover, his paper “Popular Saints,
Goddesses and Village Sacred Sites: Rereading Sikh
Experience in the Nineteenth Century” that he read at the
University of California, Berkeley, in February 1987,
revealed that he had no knowledge of Aad Guru Granth Sahib
(Sikh Scripture). And his knowledge of Sikh history was
somewhat parochial–learning from the writings of Hindus,
Christians and Marxists/Communists. Sikhs (scholars as well
as laity) criticized Oberoi’s paper for gross distortions
of Sikh religion and history.2, 3 Sikhs were alarmed and
rightly questioned Harjot Oberoi’s qualifications and
suitability for holding the Sikh Chair. To investigate his
credentials further, they requested a copy of his Ph.D.
8 thesis from Australian National University, but the
librarian denied the request on February 9, 1990:
With reference to your letter dated 7th Nov. 89, concerning the
following A. N. U. Ph.D. Thesis.
Oberoi, H. S.
A world reconstructed: religion, ritual and community among the
Sikhs, 1850-1901.
A.N.U. Ph. D. Thesis 1987.
I regret the author has denied us permission to make copies. Your
order is, therefore, cancelled.
The published version should be released soon and wishes
potential readers to consult it, when available.
Please find enclosed your open cheque.
Yours sincerely,
Lending Services Librarian,
User Services Division,
R. G. Memzies Building.4

Pursuing this matter further, on July 22, 1994, a
delegation of India-based Sikh scholars: Professors Balkar
Singh, Darshan Singh, Kehar Singh, and Gurnam Kaur held a
meeting with Professors Harjot Oberoi and Kenneth Bryant of
UBC and Professor Hugh Johnston of Simon Fraser University,
to discuss the objectives of the Sikh Chair. It was the
unanimous opinion of the Sikh scholars that the incumbent
Dr. Harjot Obroi was not contributing to the fulfillment of
the objectives spelled out in the agreement concerning the
Sikh Chair.5
Elaborating on the sordid affair of UBC Sikh Chair, Jasbir
Singh Mann writes:
It is very interesting to note that the Sikhs paid the money and
signed the contract with the UBC in 1985 but the chair was not
started until 1987. Sardar Mohinder Singh Gosal, the president of
Federation of Sikh Societies of Canada and signatory to the
contract, made a statement on July 22, 1994 “that there is
evidence to prove that the two-year delay to start this chair was
intentional under the pressure of anti-Sikh political forces.” It
seems very clear from this statement that UBC became a part of
the plan to defuse the Sikh identity from the inception of this
chair. It is possible that UBC waited for two years to hire an
applicant who was being groomed for anti-Sikh propaganda. As is
evident from the objectives of the Sikh Chair, the applicant must
be qualified for Punjabi language, Literature and Sikhism
(doctrine, religious practice, and philosophy). Dr. Oberoi has
admitted himself that he is only a student of Sikh history, has
nothing to do with religion and his qualifications for Punjabi
language and literature remain questionable. Many other
applicants with appropriate qualifications were rejected. How the
selection process was held to fulfill the special objective, as
9 outlined in the contract, is a serious matter and needs thorough
investigation.6
The following memo by Fritz Lehman lends credence to
Gosal’s assertion that UBC was consulting the Indian
Government regarding the objectives of the Sikh Chair:
TO: U. B. C. South Asianists
From: Fritz Lehmann, History (x5748)

Re: Highlights of Shashtri Indo-Canadian Institute Annual Meeting
India’s acting High Commissioner, Mr. K. P. Fabian wishes to
visit U. B. C. in the very near future to meet South Asia
Specialists and administrators. He would likely address us on an
aspect of Indian foreign policy (he prefers North-South dialogue)
and wishes to discuss the proposed chair in Sikh studies, about
which his government is concerned. He seemed to me to be a
reasonable and sympathetic person.7

Since it was the Sikh community of Canada that raised funds
for the “Sikh Chair,”8
one may ask why the Indian government
was concerned about it? And why was UBC consulting the
Indian government about the objectives of the “Sikh Chair”
and who should hold this chair? The answer to these
questions lies in what happened in India shortly after the
British imperialist relinquished their rule over the Indian
subcontinent in 1947 and divided it into two nations: one
Hindu, India and the other Muslim, Pakistan. The world
community is well aware of the genocide of Jews and Gypsies
by the Nazis, but not many people except Sikhs, Jains and
Buddhists, know the “constitutional genocide” of the three
communities by the framers of the Indian constitution. In
1949, Jawaharlal Nehru, handpicked successor of the
“apostle of peace,” Mahatma Gandhi, led the Indian
Parliament to declare Sikhs, Jains and Buddhists as Hindus
under Article 25 of the Indian Constitution in spite of the
vehement opposition of two Sikh representatives, Hukam
Singh and Bhupinder Singh Mann who refused to sign the
document. To date, the Sikh community has not signed to
ratify the Indian Constitution. Shortly thereafter, Hindu
Code Bill was imposed on them. In other words, in India,
the world’s “largest democracy,” it is the majority Hindu
community that determines the religious identity of its
minorities and imposes Hindu values and customs on them.9, 10
Distortion of Sikh history and theology to defuse the “Sikh
identity” is a common theme of the Indian Government
propaganda and Hindu controlled news media. For example,
two historians of Jawaharlal Nehru University, Satish
10 Chandra and Bipin Chandra have distorted Sikh religion and
history via books prescribed by the National Council of
Education Research and Training (NCERT) for high school
classes, XI & XII, respectively.11, 12, 13, 14 This is the
reason why the Indian government was concerned about the
Sikh Chair at UBC or for that matter at any other
university. Why did the UBC administration comply with the
wishes of the Indian government? After all, UBC kept the
chair vacant until a suitable candidate who met Indian
government’s approval was found. And that is why Harjot
Oberoi, who grew up in Delhi and got his M.A. degree from
Jawaharlal Nehru University was selected whereas several
other well-qualified candidates with better credentials
were rejected. According to Oberoi:
“My interest in social history was originally provoked
and then sustained by my teachers at the Jawaharlal
Nehru University, particularly Professors Bipan
Chandra, Sarvepalli Gopal, Romila Thapar, K.N.
Pannikar and Satish Saberwal. I hope this work
reflects what I learnt from them.”15
Under a storm of strong criticism against his qualification
and suitability to head the Sikh Chair, Harjot Oberoi
vacated it in 1995. Nevertheless, UBC found him a place in
the Department of Asian Studies from where he continues his
schedule of distorting Sikhism at every given opportunity.
References

1. Jasbir Singh Mann, Surinder Singh Sodhi, and Gurbakhsh
Singh Gill (Eds.). Invasion of Religious Boundaries.
Vancouver: Canadian Sikh Study & Teaching Society, 1995,
Appendix IV.
2. Ibid., pp. 1-373.
3. Ibid., Appendix III.
4. Ibid., Appendix II.
5. Ibid., Appendix III.
11 6. Ibid., p. 303.
7. Ibid., Appendix V.
8. Ibid., Appendix I: Memorandum of Agreement Between the
Federation of Sikh Societies of Canada and the University
of British Columbia.
9. Sangat Singh. The Sikhs In History. New Delhi: Uncommon
Books, 4th edition, 2001, pp. 280-83.
10. J. S. Grewal. The Sikhs Of The Punjab. New Delhi:
Cambridge University press, 1994, p. 183.
11. “Legal Fight Against Distortion of Sikh History.”
Abstracts of Sikh Studies, 1996, April-June, p. 120.
12. “Misrepresentation of Sikh History in NCERT Textbooks.”
Abstracts of Sikh Studies, 1996, July-September, pp. 77-84.
13. M.S. Rahi. “Sikh History as it is being taught in
Indian Schools!” Spokesman, June 1998, pp. 39-41.
14. M.S. Rahi. “New Brand of Indian Secularism and the
Sikhs.” Spokesman, January 1999, pp. 8-11.
15. Harjot Oberoi. The Construction of Religious
Boundaries: Culture, Identity and Diversity in the Sikh
Tradition. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2004, p.
xii.

Sikh Research Conferences are Showcasing Global Sikh Research

Sikh Research Conferences are Showcasing Global Sikh Research.  This is important. But Sikhs should also be aware of the controversy of some so-called “scholars.” For example, the controversial WH McLeod, Doris Jacobsh, Harjot Oberoi.  It is also important to note that there are some scholars with the same name, but are different people.  There are two people with the name “Gurinder Mann.”  One taught at Santa Barbara, while another is based in the UK.

Response to Doris Jacobsh’s Controversial work ‘Relocating Gender in Sikh History’ by Dr. Baldev Singh PHD who is an academic.  This is just the first chapter of his response.

Chapter 1
University of British Columbia (UBC)
Jakobsh’s work is a typical example of Ph.D. research
produced by a Western university with an “endowed Sikh
Chair.” Her work throws light on the motives behind Sikh
studies programs. To begin with, let us examine some
background information on UBC and her thesis supervisor.
Generally a graduate student investigates the reputation of
7 the university, the department of study and the supervisor
before committing to begin studies. It seems Jakobsh
relinquished this early homework because at the time, UBC
was already knee-deep in a controversy with the Canadian
Sikhs about the objectives of the “endowed Sikh Chair,” as
disclosed in the following advertisement:1
The Department of Asian studies anticipates making a one-year
visiting appointment in Punjabi language and literature and Sikh
Studies for the academic year 1987-1988. We invite your
application or nomination of others who may be qualified to teach
courses in beginning and intermediate Punjabi language and at
least one other field such as Sikh literature, religion or
history. Ph. D. degree required, as well as a very good command
of spoken and written Punjabi.
Candidate should send a complete C. V., samples of research
papers and publications, and the names and addresses of three
referees to Professor Daniel L. Overmyer, Head, Department of
Asian Studies, Asian Centre, 1871 West Mall, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver, B. C., Canada V6T 1W5. Candidates
should request their referees to send confidential letters of
recommendation directly to the same address. The deadline for
completion of applications is May 15, 1987.
The department expects to make a tenure-track appointment to an
endowed position in Punjabi and Sikh studies beginning in July
1988, following the University’s normal procedures. The person
appointed to the one-year visiting position may be a candidate
for the tenure-track appointment the following year.

Sincerely,
Daniel L. Overmyer,
Professor and Head.
However, without regard to the above advertisement, UBC
hired Harjot Oberoi. Amazingly, this fellow had neither
expertise nor fluency in the Punjabi language. He grew up
in Delhi and consequently had very little appreciation of
the Punjabi culture. Moreover, his paper “Popular Saints,
Goddesses and Village Sacred Sites: Rereading Sikh
Experience in the Nineteenth Century” that he read at the
University of California, Berkeley, in February 1987,
revealed that he had no knowledge of Aad Guru Granth Sahib
(Sikh Scripture). And his knowledge of Sikh history was
somewhat parochial–learning from the writings of Hindus,
Christians and Marxists/Communists. Sikhs (scholars as well
as laity) criticized Oberoi’s paper for gross distortions
of Sikh religion and history.2, 3 Sikhs were alarmed and
rightly questioned Harjot Oberoi’s qualifications and
suitability for holding the Sikh Chair. To investigate his
credentials further, they requested a copy of his Ph.D.
8 thesis from Australian National University, but the
librarian denied the request on February 9, 1990:
With reference to your letter dated 7th Nov. 89, concerning the
following A. N. U. Ph.D. Thesis.
Oberoi, H. S.
A world reconstructed: religion, ritual and community among the
Sikhs, 1850-1901.
A.N.U. Ph. D. Thesis 1987.
I regret the author has denied us permission to make copies. Your
order is, therefore, cancelled.
The published version should be released soon and wishes
potential readers to consult it, when available.
Please find enclosed your open cheque.
Yours sincerely,
Lending Services Librarian,
User Services Division,
R. G. Memzies Building.4

Pursuing this matter further, on July 22, 1994, a
delegation of India-based Sikh scholars: Professors Balkar
Singh, Darshan Singh, Kehar Singh, and Gurnam Kaur held a
meeting with Professors Harjot Oberoi and Kenneth Bryant of
UBC and Professor Hugh Johnston of Simon Fraser University,
to discuss the objectives of the Sikh Chair. It was the
unanimous opinion of the Sikh scholars that the incumbent
Dr. Harjot Obroi was not contributing to the fulfillment of
the objectives spelled out in the agreement concerning the
Sikh Chair.5
Elaborating on the sordid affair of UBC Sikh Chair, Jasbir
Singh Mann writes:
It is very interesting to note that the Sikhs paid the money and
signed the contract with the UBC in 1985 but the chair was not
started until 1987. Sardar Mohinder Singh Gosal, the president of
Federation of Sikh Societies of Canada and signatory to the
contract, made a statement on July 22, 1994 “that there is
evidence to prove that the two-year delay to start this chair was
intentional under the pressure of anti-Sikh political forces.” It
seems very clear from this statement that UBC became a part of
the plan to defuse the Sikh identity from the inception of this
chair. It is possible that UBC waited for two years to hire an
applicant who was being groomed for anti-Sikh propaganda. As is
evident from the objectives of the Sikh Chair, the applicant must
be qualified for Punjabi language, Literature and Sikhism
(doctrine, religious practice, and philosophy). Dr. Oberoi has
admitted himself that he is only a student of Sikh history, has
nothing to do with religion and his qualifications for Punjabi
language and literature remain questionable. Many other
applicants with appropriate qualifications were rejected. How the
selection process was held to fulfill the special objective, as
9 outlined in the contract, is a serious matter and needs thorough
investigation.6
The following memo by Fritz Lehman lends credence to
Gosal’s assertion that UBC was consulting the Indian
Government regarding the objectives of the Sikh Chair:
TO: U. B. C. South Asianists
From: Fritz Lehmann, History (x5748)

Re: Highlights of Shashtri Indo-Canadian Institute Annual Meeting
India’s acting High Commissioner, Mr. K. P. Fabian wishes to
visit U. B. C. in the very near future to meet South Asia
Specialists and administrators. He would likely address us on an
aspect of Indian foreign policy (he prefers North-South dialogue)
and wishes to discuss the proposed chair in Sikh studies, about
which his government is concerned. He seemed to me to be a
reasonable and sympathetic person.7

Since it was the Sikh community of Canada that raised funds
for the “Sikh Chair,”8
one may ask why the Indian government
was concerned about it? And why was UBC consulting the
Indian government about the objectives of the “Sikh Chair”
and who should hold this chair? The answer to these
questions lies in what happened in India shortly after the
British imperialist relinquished their rule over the Indian
subcontinent in 1947 and divided it into two nations: one
Hindu, India and the other Muslim, Pakistan. The world
community is well aware of the genocide of Jews and Gypsies
by the Nazis, but not many people except Sikhs, Jains and
Buddhists, know the “constitutional genocide” of the three
communities by the framers of the Indian constitution. In
1949, Jawaharlal Nehru, handpicked successor of the
“apostle of peace,” Mahatma Gandhi, led the Indian
Parliament to declare Sikhs, Jains and Buddhists as Hindus
under Article 25 of the Indian Constitution in spite of the
vehement opposition of two Sikh representatives, Hukam
Singh and Bhupinder Singh Mann who refused to sign the
document. To date, the Sikh community has not signed to
ratify the Indian Constitution. Shortly thereafter, Hindu
Code Bill was imposed on them. In other words, in India,
the world’s “largest democracy,” it is the majority Hindu
community that determines the religious identity of its
minorities and imposes Hindu values and customs on them.9, 10
Distortion of Sikh history and theology to defuse the “Sikh
identity” is a common theme of the Indian Government
propaganda and Hindu controlled news media. For example,
two historians of Jawaharlal Nehru University, Satish
10 Chandra and Bipin Chandra have distorted Sikh religion and
history via books prescribed by the National Council of
Education Research and Training (NCERT) for high school
classes, XI & XII, respectively.11, 12, 13, 14 This is the
reason why the Indian government was concerned about the
Sikh Chair at UBC or for that matter at any other
university. Why did the UBC administration comply with the
wishes of the Indian government? After all, UBC kept the
chair vacant until a suitable candidate who met Indian
government’s approval was found. And that is why Harjot
Oberoi, who grew up in Delhi and got his M.A. degree from
Jawaharlal Nehru University was selected whereas several
other well-qualified candidates with better credentials
were rejected. According to Oberoi:
“My interest in social history was originally provoked
and then sustained by my teachers at the Jawaharlal
Nehru University, particularly Professors Bipan
Chandra, Sarvepalli Gopal, Romila Thapar, K.N.
Pannikar and Satish Saberwal. I hope this work
reflects what I learnt from them.”15
Under a storm of strong criticism against his qualification
and suitability to head the Sikh Chair, Harjot Oberoi
vacated it in 1995. Nevertheless, UBC found him a place in
the Department of Asian Studies from where he continues his
schedule of distorting Sikhism at every given opportunity.
References

1. Jasbir Singh Mann, Surinder Singh Sodhi, and Gurbakhsh
Singh Gill (Eds.). Invasion of Religious Boundaries.
Vancouver: Canadian Sikh Study & Teaching Society, 1995,
Appendix IV.
2. Ibid., pp. 1-373.
3. Ibid., Appendix III.
4. Ibid., Appendix II.
5. Ibid., Appendix III.
11 6. Ibid., p. 303.
7. Ibid., Appendix V.
8. Ibid., Appendix I: Memorandum of Agreement Between the
Federation of Sikh Societies of Canada and the University
of British Columbia.
9. Sangat Singh. The Sikhs In History. New Delhi: Uncommon
Books, 4th edition, 2001, pp. 280-83.
10. J. S. Grewal. The Sikhs Of The Punjab. New Delhi:
Cambridge University press, 1994, p. 183.
11. “Legal Fight Against Distortion of Sikh History.”
Abstracts of Sikh Studies, 1996, April-June, p. 120.
12. “Misrepresentation of Sikh History in NCERT Textbooks.”
Abstracts of Sikh Studies, 1996, July-September, pp. 77-84.
13. M.S. Rahi. “Sikh History as it is being taught in
Indian Schools!” Spokesman, June 1998, pp. 39-41.
14. M.S. Rahi. “New Brand of Indian Secularism and the
Sikhs.” Spokesman, January 1999, pp. 8-11.
15. Harjot Oberoi. The Construction of Religious
Boundaries: Culture, Identity and Diversity in the Sikh
Tradition. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2004, p.
xii.

 

Who Was the Controversial WH Hew McLeod? Who Are His Followers?

Who Was the Controversial WH Hew McLeod? Who Are His Followers?

 

Whether it is Paushara, Harjot Oberoi, Gurinder Mann, Anne Murphy, Ami P. Shah, Doris Jacobsh, Louis Fenech, the list goes on…

What are these “Sikh Studies Chairs” at Academic Universities?

 

Who is the Controversial WH Hew McLeod and What is the Controversy Over Academic Chairs?

This article is from The Sikh Bulletin December 2005 Volume 7 Number 12

FOREIGN SCHOLARS TO THE AID OF
CULTURAL IMPERIALISM
From Chakravyuh, Web of Indian Secularism

Since complete annihilation of Sikh culture has been the aim right from the beginning, Sikh history has been constantly distorted. Sikh literature and sacred writings have been periodically vandalized with the climax coming in the wake of the 1984 attack on Sri Darbar Sahib when even libraries were set on fire. The alternate practice has been to discredit settled Sikh tradition, to prop up rival apocrypha Granths (religious texts) and to raise doubts about the authenticity o Sri Guru Granth Sahib (the only Sikh canon). These processes have been witnessed with increasing intensity ever since the first day of Indian de-colonisation and have often been taken note of by
the Media
One such attempt was made through the agency of Piar SingI of Guru Nanak University (funded completely by the state) and some foreign scholars. They suddenly discovered, out of the blue as it were a new recension of Guru Granth and made far-reaching conclusions. This was done to sow doubts about its originality. What was strange about this sordid affair was that no attempt was made to know the history or circumstances attending on the discovery of the manuscript under discussion. It was purchased from a bookseller, designated MS 1245 by the Guru Nanak University library and suddenly proclaimed the very original recension simultaneously here and abroad. The attempt can be compared to some nihilist guerrilla strike on a centuries old firm citadel of tradition. Sardar Daljeet Singh went to Amritsar and had a discussion with the bookseller Sardar Harbhajan Singl-Chawla. From this it was clear that this particular recension had no history worth mentioning. Harbhajan Singh later appeared at the Akal Takhat on May 5, 1993, and made a clean breast of it. The document being presented here is his statement at the Akal Takhat. Rendered into English, it would be somewhat as follows:
‘I, Harbhajan Singh Chawla (of the) firm Harbhajan Singh Harcharan Singh Chawla of Bagh Jallianwala, deal in manuscripts, paintings, and handicrafts. Today on Wednesday dated 5.5.1993, 1 am presenting the written statement to Singh Sahib Bhai Manjit Singh Jathedar of Akal Takhat at the Akal Takhat as below:
‘The manuscript marked as MS 1245, now present in the library of the Guru Nanak Dev University was purchased from me. This is how this MS 1245 reached me:
‘During my business tour of Rajasthan in the years 1979-80,1 obtained it from a petty scrap dealer doing the round, on bicycle, of the city of Raisinghnagar of district Ganganagar. On enquiry, I came to know that he had bought it from some house in a village as scrap. It was lying with me for about three to four years. During this period I showed it to a Bhai Kamail Singh who has interest an in manuscripts and works as a scripture reader at Sri Darbar Sahib and asked him to give his views about it. ‘It was his opinion, about this manuscript, which I wrote in a note describing it. The librarian of Guru Nanak Dev University bought this manuscript from me for the university library. I received its sale price. The note about the resencion written by me is not based on my research about it. Whatever Bhai Kamail Singh told me, is what I wrote in my note’.
sd./ Humble servant, Harbhajan Singh Chawla , 5.5.93, Place – Sri Akal Takhat Sahib, Shop – Harbhajan Singh Harcharan Singh, Bazar Jallianwala, Amritsar.
Now that the reader knows about the origin of the note appended to the manuscript by the antique dealer, s/he will be shocked to find out that the three or four points made therein, tallied absolutely with the research diligently conducted by Doctors Piar Singh and Pashaura Singh. It was on the basis of such research that textual study of the Sikh scripture was seriously suggested and the original — which is in existence, has a continuous history of custody and has been examined by hundreds of scholars for nearly four centuries — was challenged. When this was pointed out, many eminent scholars cried persecution, pleaded academic freedom, questioned the ability of us ignorant easterners to understand the intricacies of western scholarship and conjured up images of medieval inquisition and witch hunting on Spanish and French models. The only ‘punishment’ meted out to the offending scholars for the well-established crime of blasphemy, was to do voluntary social service at a shrine of their choice and for a period of few weeks. It must be remembered that even such punishment can be traditionally inflicted if the offender freely consents to undergo it. In the present case the consent was obtained. The greatly offended Western scholar can contrast this with the treatment meted out to Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury or to Joan of Arc and a hundred thousand others.

Who was the The Controversial WH McLeod and the Controversy Over Academic Chairs?
Who was the controversial WH Hew McLeod? Was he a historian? An Academic? A scholar? Was he not a theologian? Is that possible?

Let’s see what he had to say:

But are we to believe it?

mcleod

Will Western Academics “Discover Sikhism” Do Sikhs need to be “Discovered” by the West?

 

We can also listen to different academics:

Who were the controversial WH Hew McLeod’s followers?

pashaura

Someone’s Views on Dr. Pashaura, a follower of the controversial WH McLeod

What else should we know?

The Guru and Gurbani is the most important when doing this sort of research.

Western academics HAVE responded to the controversy of WH Hew McLeod:

https://www.scribd.com/doc/127483816/Cynthia-on-McLeod

It is important to read the responses within academia.

How much does it take to establish a chair at a University? What is the role of the university, the academic, the donor, the community, the taxpayers, etc.?

These are all questions that require transparency.

Many ask for education of Sikhs. Many times these are valid issues and ideas. We would definately have to do more research on these.

Relocating_Gender_in_sikh_history

Are Controversial Sikh Studies Chairs Serving Our Interest?

Some Contest Controversial Chair

These are issues that require much attention.

 

 

The Controversial WH McLeod and the Controversy Over Academic Chairs

Who was the controversial WH Hew McLeod?  Was he a historian? An Academic? A scholar? Was he not a theologian? Is that possible?

Let’s see what he had to say:

But are we to believe it?

 

mcleod

Will Western Academics “Discover Sikhism” Do Sikhs need to be “Discovered” by the West?

We can also read academic works:

We can also listen to different academics:

Who were the controversial WH Hew McLeod’s followers?

What else must we know?

The Guru and Gurbani is the most important when doing this sort of research.

https://www.scribd.com/doc/127483816/Cynthia-on-McLeod

Western academics HAVE responded to the controversy of WH Hew McLeod:

It is important to read the responses within academia.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/103300035/Response-to-Dr-Gurinder-Mann-From-Book-History-of-the-Sikhs-and-Their-Religion-Volume-I-The-Guru-Period-Edited-by-Kirpal-Singh-Kharak-Singh

 

 

How much does it take to establish a chair at a University? What is the role of the university, the academic, the donor, the community, the taxpayers, etc.?

These are all questions that require transparency.

Many ask for education of Sikhs. Many times these are valid issues and ideas.  We would definately have to do more research on these.

Are Controversial Sikh Studies Chairs Serving Our Interest?

Some Contest Controversial Chair

These are issues that require much attention.